I have more stories from vascular, but the best ones are so unique, they’re almost worthy of being published case reports, so I don’t want to tell them for a while, for hipaa-type reasons.

In general, I’m going to miss this month. Usually it’s a service the residents love to hate, because it’s so insanely busy, and the patients, though wonderful people, have a propensity to spiral at any moment. You have to have a much higher level of suspicion for all kinds of things, from heart attacks and strokes to UTIs and wound infections.

But I had perhaps the best chief of the year, and one of the best junior residents, and the attendings are great. Most vascular attendings are. There’s something about the field that attracts people who like to dissect a problem with protracted analysis (for ischemic disease in the leg, you can do almost innumerable angioplasties, you can do femoral-femoral bypasses, iliac-femoral bypasses, femoral-popliteal bypasses, femoral-anterior tibial bypasses, femoral posterior tibial bypasses, and all of the above with either harvested vein or one of three different kinds of prosthetic grafts; now let’s discuss which one would be best for this patient), and yet also enjoy intense surgeries which can last all day long and get into serious blood loss and potential for complications. It’s different from general surgery, which I think tends more toward quick, clear-cut solutions (either the bowel is dead or not, so you should operate on it, or not).

Sign-out at the end of the month is time-consuming. Figure 15-20 patients per intern, plus 5-10 consults, all of whom need to be explained in rather more detail than just the nightly sign-out (which, if the person’s been there forĀ a few days, often consists of “post-op day three, eating ok, working on increasing activity and planning for discharge; no impending problems”). At the end of the month, you need to give what surgery was done, why it was done, what the other medical problems are, what you’re doing about them (on vascular, this consists of a lot of afib-coumadin and hypercoagulable disorder-heparin drip arrangements, as well as blood pressure meds and other things), what infections they’ve got and what antibiotics have been gone through so far, how well they’re walking, what their family situation is like and how likely they are to have good help at home when they leave, in addition to who needs surgery in the next few days and who’s at risk for major cardiac or respiratory issues in the near future. Plus, it’s nice to give the next intern a heads-up about which attending wants his notes written by a certain time, which attending hates consulting endocrinology, which attending wishes you would consult all the specialty services and don’t mention medicine to him, which attending does all the fistulas, and all the details that keep you from stepping on the invisible mines. That takes 3-45 minutes, if you’re both being conscientious; and then you still have to go and get signed-out to about your new service. It’s nice when it happens on weekends, there’s more time for talking. Otherwise you find yourself running up against the end of the day, when staying for an hour and a half (total, spread out) could mess up your hours.

And then, I also like to walk around and say goodbye to my patients, especially the ones who’ve been there for more than a day. I don’t know what they think, but I’m under the impression that we have a little bit of a relationship, at least some recognition by them that I work for their surgeon and have been trying to take good care of them, and it’s nice to give them some warning that a stranger will be walking in to wake them up at 5am tomorrow.

About these ads